menu

WA Cascades near and west of crest - north of Stevens Pass

Avalanche Special Advisory i

Issued: Wed, April 23, 2014 at 8:44 AM
Expires: Wed, April 23, 2014 at 6:00 PM

Issued: 8:44 AM Wednesday, April 23, 2014
by Garth Ferber

Please note that regularly scheduled mountain weather and avalanche forecasts for the past winter season have ended.  However, weather and snow conditions will continue to be monitored at the Northwest Avalanche Center with the information that remains available. Additional forecasts or special statements will be issued according to the criteria and schedule given here.

Special statement updated 830 am Wednesday 23 April.

Heightened avalanche conditions are expected in this area on Wednesday mainly near and west of the crest. Evaluation snow and terrain carefully and identify snow conditions and terrain features of concern.

Avalanche Concerns

Loose Weti

Loose wet avalanches occur where water is running through the snowpack, and release at or below the trigger point. Avoid terrain traps such as cliffs, gullies, or tree wells. Exit avalanche terrain when you see pinwheels, roller balls, a slushy surface, or during rain-on-snow events.

  • Avalanche Concerni
  • Aspect/Elevationi
  • Likelihoodi
  • Sizei

Storm Slabsi

Storm slabs usually stabilize within a few days, and release at or below the trigger point. They exist throughout the terrain, and can be avoided by waiting for the storm snow to stabilize.

  • Avalanche Concerni
  • Aspect/Elevationi
  • Likelihoodi
  • Sizei

Wind Slabi

Wind slabs can take up to a week to stabilize. They are confined to lee and cross-loaded terrain features and can be avoided by sticking to sheltered or wind scoured areas.

  • Avalanche Concerni
  • Aspect/Elevationi
  • Likelihoodi
  • Sizei

Snowpack Analysis:

It might be late April but Mother Nature isn't watching the calendar and more weather systems have been moving across the Northwest so far this week.

New snowfall for the 24 hours ending Wednesday morning varies quite a bit from north to south with about 2-3 inches from Baker to Stevens, about 5 inches Snoqualmie to Crystal and about 12 inches Paradise to Hood mainly in the ATL and NTL zones. A little less is likely at Hurricane and along the Cascade east slopes.

Detailed Forecast for Wednesday:

Showers should decrease and become light in most of the Washington Cascades on Wednesday. But snow showers are going to be slower to let up at Mt Rainier and are not expected to let up much at all and remain moderate to heavy on Wednesday at Mt Hood.

New snow will be very susceptible to strong spring solar effects and strong daytime warming!

Especially where snowfall is heaviest in the south Cascades and Mt Hood. Avalanche concerns in this brief statement will be listed as very likely at Mt Hood, likely for the Snoqualmie to Mt Rainier area, and possible for the Baker to Stevens area.